Springs Fever: A Field & Recreation Guide to 500 Florida Springs.
2nd Edition by Joe Follman and Richard Buchanan

Unnamed St. Marks Sulfur Spring #1

Wakulla County

Summary of Features

  • Scale - 3rd magnitude (estimated)
  • Scenery - very good
  • How Pristine? - next to crumbling dock, infested with exotic vegetation
  • Swimming - no
  • Protection - unknown
  • Crowds - none
  • Access - difficult, water only
  • Facilities - none
  • Safety - very good
  • Scuba - no
  • Cost - free

Directions

From downtown Tallahassee, go south on Monroe Street which becomes State Road 363 or Woodville Highway. Turn left on State Road 267. After four miles, turn left on U.S. 98 and proceed to point where the highway crosses the St. Marks River. A boat launch is on the NE side of the bridge. Put in boat and go 5+ miles upriver. The spring is on the left (west) side of the river, on the edge of the river, about 50 yards before a substantial widening of the river, and about 100 yards before (south of) utility wires that cross the river. The spring is about 1 mile south of the river rise/St. Marks Spring.

For maps, latitude/longitude data, driving directions, satellite imagery, and topographic representations as well as weather conditions at this spring, go to Greg Johnson's informative "Florida Springs Database" web site at the following address:  http://www.ThisWaytothe.Net/springs/floridasprings.htm#Florida

Spring Description

The spring is on the edge of the river amid heavy aquatic vegetation in a small alcove about 12 feet in diameter. Water flows from an indeterminate depth to create a visible boil on the surface amid thick hydrilla or elodea. The depth is probably around six feet, based on the depth of the surrounding river. The spring boil is about 3 feet across, and the water is clear with a fairly strong sulfur smell. There are white deposits on the plants at the spring. Land around the spring is thick floodplain forest. There is a dock about 20 feet downstream, with a boardwalk extending over to the spring from it, parallel to the river. This boardwalk was partially collapsed on date of visit in May 2001.

Use/Access

The spring is small and mostly plant-covered. There is no apparent current use, although the adjacent boardwalk suggests it was formerly used for swimming.

Local Springiana

Personal Impressions

Landowners near the spring did not know of any name for this spring.

Nearby Springs

Other Nearby Natural Features