Springs Fever: A Field & Recreation Guide to 500 Florida Springs.
2nd Edition by Joe Follman and Richard Buchanan

Salt Spring
Pasco County

Summary of Features
  • Scale -2nd magnitude

  • Scenery - fair to excellent
    How Pristine? - adjacent to mall and near highway, but spring pretty pristine
    Swimming - no
    Protection - excellent
    Crowds - none
    Access - none at time of publication; site in process of development as a state park 

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Directions
The spring is directly behind the south end of Gulfview Square Mall in Port Richey. From U.S. 19, turn west onto Salt Springs Road at the south end of the mall. Drive to the back of the mall and continued on the road which becomes sandy and passes alongside the mall’s holding pond to the right (north). The spring pond will become visible through shrubs and grass to the left (south). Across from the west corner of the mall holding pond, look for and proceed down a path 200 yards to the spring run and spring.

For maps, latitude/longitude data, driving directions, satellite imagery, and topographic representations as well as weather conditions at this spring, go to Greg Johnson's informative "Florida Springs Database" web site at the following address:  http://www.ThisWaytothe.Net/springs/floridasprings.htm#Florida

Spring Description
The spring forms an oval-shaped pond behind it with dimensions of about 200 by 300 feet. Water flows from an indeterminate spot at the western end of the pond, either at the head of the pond or just before a constriction that flows an S-shaped run about 100 feet wide and 10-25 feet across. Water flows strongly in the short run, which is surrounded by shrubs and trees. While water in the lake is dark, the run is lighter and has some green color although it is not very clear. The run narrows and flows over a dirt/limestone road into an estuary/bayou system and thence into the Gulf of Mexico. Just below the spot where the run crosses the road is another vent in very shallow water.

Wetterhall and Rosenau (citing Wetterhall) describe two limestone bridges under which water flows. One of the bridges is likely the road over (and under as well?) which the spring flowed on date of visit in May 2001. JF did not see any spot where the run went underground, but there was also a second spot in which the water became very shallow and he was able to wade across. The locations of these two shallow spots correspond roughly to the Wetterhall descriptions:

The water flows 100 feet westward to a natural bridge where it enters a hole in a vertical bank, flows about 3 feet underground, and then emerges from a hole in the opposite vertical bank . . . the water flows about 75 feet westward to another natural bridge about 10 feet wide and emerges from three holes in the bottom of the sloping western side of the natural bridge (1965, pp. 19, 22). Use/Access Personal Impressions
Salt Springs State Park is now the 13th spring park in the state system. It acquisition is a happy testament to the efforts of citizens and local and state officials and their recognition of the value and fragility of this unique Florida feature.

Nearby Springs

Other Nearby Natural Features
Hillsborough River State Park
Little Manatee State Recreation Area
Fort DeSoto Park
Egmont Key State Park
Caladesi Island State Park
Honeymoon Island State Park