Springs Fever: A Field & Recreation Guide to 500 Florida Springs.
2nd Edition by Joe Follman and Richard Buchanan

Rhodes Springs

Leon County

Summary of Features

  • Scale - 2nd magnitude
  • Scenery - fine
  • How Pristine? - remnants of flume in run and adjacent to dirt road, otherwise very unspoiled
  • Swimming - none
  • Protection - fair
  • Crowds - none
  • Access - very good
  • Facilities - none
  • Safety - good
  • Scuba -no
  • Cost - free

Directions

From Tallahassee, take U.S. 319 south to State Road 363 (Woodville Highway) south to Natural Bridge Road east toward Natural Bridge. Turn right at Old Plank Road; springs are on the immediate right.

Google Maps

Spring Description

Rhodes is a pair of two small and attractive springs that lie in a fringe of dense forest adjacent to an area of extensive logging. Rhodes is a spring-sink combination or Karst Window (see below). The two springs well up from crevices about 100 feet apart. Each upwelling creates a small pool and run. After 50-75 feet, the two runs join, then flow for another 200 feet before disappearing into a sink at the edge of the road. If viewed from the air through the canopy of trees, the springs system would look like a "Y." The run is about 10 feet wide and a few feet deep except at the vents and the sink. There is evidence of an old log flume in the run, which ends at the edge of Old Plank Road. There is a gentle counterclockwise swirl of water going down into the sink. The water has been clear every time the authors visited. It can have a green tinge because it is canopied and there is abundant vegetation and some algae in the water. Just beyond the springs is a small sink, and just beyond that is Natural Bridge Road.

Note: Based on new classification system by hydrologists, Rhodes is now characterized as a "karst window" (where the rise and sink of water from the Floridan Aquifer is visible) and not a spring.

Use/Access


Local Springiana

Personal Impressions

The appearance of the end of the short spring run just a few feet off Old Plank Road is surprising—almost startling. The run simply ends right at the road, and it looks as if the road is a manmade impediment.

Nearby Springs


Other Nearby Natural Features