Springs Fever: A Field & Recreation Guide to 500 Florida Springs.
2nd Edition by Joe Follman and Richard Buchanan

Hornsby Spring
Alachua County

  • Summary of Features
    • Scale - 1st magnitude
    • Scenery - fine
    • How Pristine? - boardwalk and swim/recreation area around spring, floatin water, land above spring is cleared and park- or campus-like
    • Swimming - excellent
    • Protection - excellent
    • Crowds - can be heavy
    • Access - private, access must be arranged
    • Facilities - outstanding
    • Safety - excellent
    • Scuba - only with special permission
    • Cost - varies

    Spring pool/swim area
    Mouth of Hornsby Run, site of Darby Spring
    Hornsby run during drought

    Directions
    From downtown High Springs, drive about 1 mile on U.S. 41/441 to entranceto (and sign for) Camp Kulaqua on the right. Follow dirt road about 1.5miles to Camp Kulaqua grounds and the spring. There are signs in the Camp.

    For maps, latitude/longitude data, driving directions, satelliteimagery, and topographic representations as well as weather conditionsat this spring, go to Greg Johnson's informative "Florida Springs Database"web site at the following address:  http://www.ThisWaytothe.Net/springs/floridasprings.htm#Florida

    Spring Description
    The spring pool is about 150 feet wide and 150 feet long before narrowinginto a run that flows about 0.8 mile to join the Santa Fe River a shortdistance above the U.S. 41/441 bridge.  The water is clear and blueand flows from under a long (50 feet) limestone ledge.  The ledgeis 15-20 feet deep, and a lifeguard at the spring said the bottom was morethan 40 feet deep.  The spring run can be paddled in times of normalto high water on the river, but can also be obstructed. The run flows througha bottom-land floodplain area with hardwoods.   There are smallsprings in the run.  Land above the spring rises perhaps 18 feet ina park-like setting withlarge hardwood trees and buildings associated withCamp Kulaqua.  There are boardwalks and swimming facilities (diveboard, lifeguard chair, large flotation device) at and in the spring.

    Use/Access

  • The spring is part of Camp Kulaqua, a church-owned facility used for summercamps, retreats, meetings, and conferences. It has full lodging, dining,and worship facilities as well as stables, trails, swimming, a zoo, anda small nature museum.
  • The float in the pool is like that in Camp Indian Springs in Wakulla County—along inflatable tube. Bathers jump onto the tube, crawl out to the end,and are then catapulted into the water by the next person who jumps ontothe tube.
  • The swim area has a lifeguard.
  • At some points during the drought of 1998-2001, there was no flow fromthis spring and its run wa s dry.
  • Personal Impressions
    The spring is lovely, well maintained, and in a beautiful setting designedto restore the mind, body, and soul.

    Lo ca l Spr ingiana
    Bones from large Pleistocene-era animals have been found in the spring,including a mastodon bone imbedded with the head of a spear and dated to12,000 years ago (Adventure Outpost, n.d.).

    Nearby Springs

  • Darby Spring
  • Columbia Spring
  • COL428981
  • Santa Fe Spring
  • Santa Fe River Rise Spring
  • Other Nearby Natural Features
  • Ichetucknee Springs State Park
  • O’Leno State Park
  • San Felasco Hammock State Preserve
  • Devil’s Millhopper State Geologic Site
  • River Rise State Preserve
  • Mike Roess Gold Head Branch State Park
  • Contact Information
    Camp Kulaqua
    High Springs, Fla.
    386-454-1351